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Erick Camargo



São Paulo
SP - Brasil


819 Mensagens

 Publicado - 02/07/2009 :  4:04:39 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Erick Camargo a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado
Vale muito a pena pessoal, visitem:

PhilippinesNudibranchs and their Friends
   If someone tells you that they spend a lot of time and effort travellingaround the world photographing slugs then you might think them rather odd,but for many scuba divers the pursuit of sea slugs (otherwise known asnudibranchs) has become a passion.   There are over 3000 typesof nudibranch, living everywhere from Antarctica to the tropics, so there'splenty to keep the divers happy.
   This Nembrotha cristata looks more like a terrestrial slug thanany of the other sea slugs I saw during two weeks in the Philippine Islands,though there aren't many terrestrial slugs which boast its bold colorsand patterns. 
Boldcolors and patterns are par for the course as far as nudibranchs are concerned,and it's the reason why people become so enamored with them.  Also par for the course are Latin names - this species is known to itsfriends as Chromodoris magnifica, with no prizes given to anyonewho can guess what "magnifica" means in English!   It might seemthat this individual is leaning forward to sniff the thing growing in frontof it, but in fact nudibranchs don't rate too highly in the intelligencestakes, and it's usually a mistake to credit them with thinking or evenbasic smarts beyond crawling around, eating and avoiding pain.
click here to open a new window with this photo in computer wallpaper format
   Chromodoris annae (Anna's chromodoris) seems to have a particular likingfor the leathery sponge that I found this individual on, because most ofthe photos I've seen of this species show it on the same background.  Apparently they can reach about 5 centimeters in length, but I think thisone was a little smaller.

   It obviously considers this stuff delicious, you can see that it was takinga mouthful as I took the photo, and there's another hole behind it whereit had previously satisfied its cravings.

   Unlike land slugs, all sea slugs are carnivorous, however they both eatusing a rasp or "radula", a tongue-like ribbon with rows of teeth madeof chiton.   These teeth are constantly being worn out, so newrows are always being added as the old ones are discarded. 

Chromodoriscoi has a rather understated elegance, it might not have lots of differentcolours but the clearly delineated markings on its back are very striking.
click here to open a new window with this photo in computer wallpaper format
   The elegance continues below, with a distinct purple line around the outeredges of the mantle merging into a diffused mauve band under the mantle.  Then just to drive the fashion statement home, there's a clear line extendingall around the animal just above the foot it uses to glide around the reef.

   This species is known for the way it flaps its mantle rhythmically up anddown as it moves, eating sponges and reaching up to 6 centimeters in length.Chromodorisannae and Chromodoris coi aren't the only slugs on this pagewhich eats sponges, in fact sponges are what all of the Chromodorisslugs eat.   It's the largest genus of nudibranchs, which mustbe a pretty depressing thought if you're a sponge.

click here to open a new window with this photo in computer wallpaper format   Unless you're particularly lazy, unintelligent or unobservant, you've almostcertainly noticed by now the frilly or tentacle-like projections on thebacks of all of these nudibranchs; these are the "naked gills" which givenudibranchs their name.   The things at the front aren't theeye stalks which you see on land slugs and snails, instead they're called"rhinophores", which is a mixed Latin and Greek word meaning "carryingnoses" - which just means that they house the organs of smell, a usefulthing for critters which often roam around at night.

   This species is Chromodoris willani, there are several species withsimilar blue and black colouring, so the white specks on the gills andrhinopores are the surest way to recognise it.   And that funnylooking lump on the animal's side?   Well, you'll find out soonenough what that is!

click here to open a new window with this photo in computer wallpaper format   Nembrotha chamberlaini is one of the few nudibranchs I saw with largeamounts of red coloration.    The reason there might beso few red nudibranchs is that this is the first color to be lost by the"selective absorption" of light underwater - below about 5 meters almostall of the red light has been absorbed by the water, which is why diverswho cut themselves are usually surprised to see that the blood which comesout looks black!

   Red is a good warning color in very shallow water, but nudibranchs tendto live a bit deeper than that, which is why I only saw three of them inthe ten or more years while I was freediving, but all of the ones on thispage in my first scuba dives.

   Anyway, this is a very attractive species, but it's found only in the Philippinesand Indonesia, and although I saw quite a few of them they were only scientificallydescribed as late as 1997.

 
Oh my word, here'stwo of them together and they're... they're... joined together!  It might look like they're just holding hands, but in fact things havegone much further than that, and this is actually a photo of them mating.  Sea slugs are hermaphrodites, each individual is both male and female,and during mating they each give and receive sperm at the same time, andthen later they will both lay eggs.   This species feeds on ascidians,one of which you can see in the bottom-right hand corner of this photo,and another near the bottom-left, though these two slugs seem to have otherpreoccupations at the moment.
Sex,sex and more sex!   This time it's Chromodoris lochi,a species found all the way from Africa in the west to Japan in the north,Australia in the south, and Tonga in the east.   In this shotyou can see the penises charged with sperm as their reproductive organsinterlock.   Interestingly, the slug at the top of the photohas sustained an injury above its genitals and it also seems to have lostits gills.
click here to open a new window with this photo in computer wallpaper format
Or has it?  That same nudibranch had had quite enough fun for one day, so it made itsexit, and as it did so, its gills started to pop up from the protectivepouch where they'd been withdrawn.
 
With its gills prettymuch fully restored, this slug meanders off to have a cigarette, or whateverthe nudibranch equivalent is.   Sex is about the most complicatedthing most sea slugs are capable of, though they're obviously also outfittedto track down their favorite foods, which in the case of some nudibranchsmeans actually following the slime trails of other nudibranchs and theneating them!
ThisnudibranchPhyllidia varicosa, sometimes called the scrambled eggnudibranch, doesn't have the feathery gills of the slugs earlier on thispage, instead it has leaflike secondary gills under the skirt of its mantle.  It releases a toxic and apparently pungent mucus when disturbed, whichis poisonous to fish and crustaceans like shrimp and lobster.  It can reach a length of over 10 centimeters.
   More nudibranchs without feathery gills.

    I've never seen a "cf" in the middle of a scientific name before, but Phyllidiellacf. annulata proves that there's a first time for everything.  The "cf" is short for "compare to" in Latin, and this Latin name means"I'm not quite sure what this thing is, but it obviously belongs to thegenus Phyllidiella and if you compare it to Phyllidiella annulatayou'll see that it's very similar".   This is really an indicationof how little is known about many of the nudibranchs, including what arethe ranges of different species, and what they eat.

 
Some nudibranchsprefer to live on hard surfaces and some like to live on sediment, andeven bury themselves while waiting to go out on their next feeding foray.  Like regular slugs and snails, they exude a slime which allows them toslide over rough surfaces like sand and coral.
 
Thenudibranch Phyllidiella pustulosa drew the short straw when it cameto naming, since "pustulous" means "covered with pimples, blisters or pus-filledlesions"!   It's apparently a very common and widespread species.  I love the background this one is crawling across.
   This isn't much of a photo and I normally wouldn't include it on a pagelike this, but it seemed interesting because it's a different color formof the last nudibranch, Phyllidiella pustulosa.

   There's often a tremendous amount of variation in coloration and patternsbetween individuals of the same species, which makes identification eventrickier.

 
Frompus blisters to bouquets of little blue flowers?   Phyllidiaocellata is extremely variable in its pattern, and even the color ofthe tubercles on its back vary, in most photos they're yellow, and theblack markings also differ greatly from one individual to another.
   ThisPhilinopsis pilsbryi was moving quite fast when I found itduring a night dive in less than two meters of water at Anilao, thoughit was being knocked around a bit by the surge.

    Unlike most of the other species you've seen so far on this page, thisone hunts prey which has some small hope of escaping - small worms livingin the sand or other substrate.

 
Forsome time Hypselodoris purpureomaculosa was only known to live inJapan and the Philippines, but now they've been found in Indonesia andthe Solomon Islands as well.   Some of the photos I've seen ofit show its markings being all dull brown, but I think this specimen looksmuch better, and it fits the name "purple-spotted Hypselodoris" bettertoo.
click here to open a new window with this photo in computer wallpaper format
Glossodorisaverni is the red margined glossodoris, though my one seems to be rathermore yellow or orange margined than some of the photos I've seen.  They're more restricted in range than some of these other species, havingbeen seen only from Australia through to New Guinea and up the Philippinesto Vietnam.
 
ThisThecacerapicta is a very cool little slug.   Some of them have moreblack lines and sometimes the lines are more joined up and thicker, andthere are even lots of black dots scattered all over the body, so perhapsmine is a juvenile which isn't fully developed.
click here to open a new window with this photo in computer wallpaper format   The thing I really like about this species is the way you can see its internalorgans through the translucent body, a characteristic feature of this genus,as are the long horns on its back, which in some species can be extendedand retracted.

    The greyish lump you see inside this animal is the gut.   Mostof the nudibranchs with feathery gills on this page have them near theback of the body, but here they're closer to the front.

 
Landslugs don't get too large, but sea slugs get to quite a size, like thisDolabellaauricularia, the "ear lobe Dolabella".   This type belongsto a group called "sea hares", which range in size from 2 centimeters to70 centimeters (2.3 feet)!   All the sea hares have rolled uprhinophores on the top of their head, which you can see at the right-handside of this photo, and also rolled up oral tentacles on either side ofthe mouth.  Buried inside there's a fairly large flattened shell.  They eat algae and produce a reddish purple "ink" from it, which mightbe a form of chemical protection - there have certainly been a number ofcases of dogs dying after eating these animals.   I saw thisspecimen at the "Basura" dive site in Anilao, and I also saw two othervery large nudibranchs down in Bohol.   I saw all three on nightdives, the ones in Bohol had far more spectacular colors and patterns thanthis one, however since it was my first night scuba dive I wasn't allowedto take my camera with me so I don't have any photos!
Well,I mentioned that nudibranchs have friends, and now I'll introduce you toa couple of them!   The first one might easily be mistaken fora nudibranch but it's not, instead it's a flatworm which I'm told is anundescribed species found only in the Philippines which belongs to thegenus Pseudoceros.   Like nudibranchs, marine flatwormsare hermaphrodites and it's possible that the wound near the top, right-handend of this individual is from mating, since many species mate by insertingtheir penis into any part of their partner's body; wherever the sperm endsup, it migrates to the animal's ovaries where fertilization happens.  Unlike nudibranchs, flatworms don't have gills, instead they breathe directlythrough their skin.  They're less common than nudibranchs, and althoughthe flatworm shown here is quite an attractive species, I saw a far morebeautiful one on that first night dive at Alano Beach when I had no camera!
 
Anotherworm, this time a bristle worm called Chloeia fusca.  Bristle worms are also called fire worms because the thousands of hairson their bodies are hollow and filled with poison, providing protectionagainst predators in a similar way to the irritant hairs on manycaterpillar species.   The most spectacular fireworm of allisn't particularly hairy, instead it's an irridescent creature which livesin long holes in the sediment and reaches up to 15 meters in length and2.5 centimeters in diameter!   They feed by poking their headout of their burrow, with vicious looking grasping jaws around the mouth,a feature which earned them the rather fearful name of "bobbit worm", afterthe guy who had his penis cut off by his wife.


"Copiar uma idéia é plágio, várias, é pesquisa"!

Whatsapp: 11 968284685 (TIM)
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Orlando Jensen



Telemaco Borba
PR - Brasil


687 Mensagens

  #730648 Publicado - 02/07/2009 :  4:09:51 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Orlando Jensen a lista de contatos
Realmente são obra prima da natureza. Muito lindas. Obrigado por compartilhar conosco. Abraço.
Editado por - Orlando Jensen em 02/07/2009 4:28:02 PM
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Erick Camargo



São Paulo
SP - Brasil


819 Mensagens

  #730653 Publicado - 02/07/2009 :  4:32:11 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Erick Camargo a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado
Relamente, eu gostaria de saber se alguém tem pra vender no Brazil, e se realmente custam uma fortuna....

Abraços!

"Copiar uma idéia é plágio, várias, é pesquisa"!

Whatsapp: 11 968284685 (TIM)
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Ricardo Bonino



São Paulo
SP - Brasil


193 Mensagens

  #730665 Publicado - 02/07/2009 :  5:13:31 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Ricardo Bonino a lista de contatos
São muito lindos mesmo.. Pena que é quase impossível manter a maioria desses animais...
Ricardo
Meu reef: http://www.reefcorner.org/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=94250
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Rodrigo Gerez



Curitiba
PR - Brasil


281 Mensagens

  #730669 Publicado - 02/07/2009 :  5:32:45 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Rodrigo Gerez a lista de contatos

Cara, muito bonito!

 

Imagina ver isso ao vivo, Faltou as espanholas que tinha (ou tem) no octavio!

 

Abs


Agua mole pedra dura, tanto bate até que molha!
Editado por - Rodrigo Gerez em 02/07/2009 5:37:53 PM
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Alex Wardog



Joao Pessoa
PB - Brasil


2326 Mensagens

  #730701 Publicado - 02/07/2009 :  7:21:37 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Alex Wardog a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Saum animais lindos, pena que naum dura muito em aquario!!
Alex(tecfjpalex@ibest.com.br)

WARDOG!!!
MEU AQUARIO:http://www.reefcorner.org/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=127941
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Moacir Bernardo



São Carlos
SP - Brasil


351 Mensagens

  #730756 Publicado - 02/07/2009 :  11:09:41 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Moacir Bernardo a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado

isso que eu chamo de obra de arte , imagine se picasso estevesse vivo , o cara iria ter uma parada cardiaca , rsrssrssr.


ÁGUA É VIDA
MO_BERNARDO@yahoo.com.br
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Yuri Barros



São Paulo
SP - Brasil


816 Mensagens

  #730902 Publicado - 03/07/2009 :  2:25:49 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Yuri Barros a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado
Bem Lôco.................
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Washington Ferreira



Belo Horizonte
MG - Brasil


309 Mensagens

  #731245 Publicado - 05/07/2009 :  02:57:16 AM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Washington Ferreira a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado
Cara muito lindo!!! Obrigado por compartilhar!!
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Marcos Melo



Curitiba
PR - Brasil


310 Mensagens

  #731271 Publicado - 05/07/2009 :  11:27:45 AM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Marcos Melo a lista de contatos
Não qualificado

É a perfeição da natureza. Valeu.

 

Abs


Marcos Melo
marcosmelo29@yahoo.com.br
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Alexandre Abel



São Vicente-litoral
SP - Brasil


229 Mensagens

  #731310 Publicado - 05/07/2009 :  4:11:48 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Alexandre Abel a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado

Realmente são muito lindos, mas não seria legal manter em reef, quando mais colorido mais veneno ele tem.


Abel
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Marcus Jacobsen



Canoas
RS - Brasil


1258 Mensagens

  #731486 Publicado - 06/07/2009 :  1:22:10 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Marcus Jacobsen a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Lindas fotos.... Pra variar os que temos aqui no Brasil são mais feinhos..... Igualmente devem ficar na natureza, pois não vão à diante no aqua...... Valew..........
Vamos conversando...........

Abraços,
Marcus.
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Luiz Gonçalves



Moderador



Reef de Anemonas

São Paulo - Vl Formosa
SP - Brasil


4757 Mensagens

  #731494 Publicado - 06/07/2009 :  1:53:01 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Luiz Gonçalves a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
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Erick,

 

Show de imagens ...

 

Outro animal que parece pintado á mão é o Peixe Mandarin ... acho lindo demais !!!

 

Valeu, abraço

 

Luiz

 


E-mail / MSN luiz.alfa@brturbo.com.br

Meu REEF DE ANEMONAS
http://www.reefcorner.org/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=150522

"Ter problemas na vida é inevitável, ser derrotado por eles é opcional"
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Ronaldo Pinto



São Paulo - Vila Ema
SP - Brasil


10499 Mensagens

  #731508 Publicado - 06/07/2009 :  2:55:00 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Ronaldo Pinto a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Realmente um show a parte!!!!
Ronaldo Pinto
(11)99995-7811
ronaldojcp@hotmail.com

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Erick Camargo



São Paulo
SP - Brasil


819 Mensagens

  #731563 Publicado - 06/07/2009 :  7:58:01 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Erick Camargo a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado
Realmente, eu queria muito ter um, pena que ainda só vão bem em aquários grandes por causa da "micro-fauna" que consegue se reproduzir rapidamente em aquários grandes fazendo com que a comida dele nunca acabe, já vi uns que comem "artêmias" mas ainda assim é dificil manter..

Eu prefiro o Green que é este daki de baixo do que o "Spotted", parece uns alvos pintados neles...mas ainda em show de cores prefiro o Green!




E qual será este peixe?

Um Black Clark? mas cadê a 3º faixa? será um "erro, na verdade raro erro"?



Abraços á todos!

"Copiar uma idéia é plágio, várias, é pesquisa"!

Whatsapp: 11 968284685 (TIM)

Editado por - Erick Camargo em 06/07/2009 7:59:27 PM
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Luiz Gonçalves



Moderador



Reef de Anemonas

São Paulo - Vl Formosa
SP - Brasil


4757 Mensagens

  #731684 Publicado - 07/07/2009 :  12:44:11 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Luiz Gonçalves a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado

Oi Erick,

 

Era esse mandarim mesmo que eu me referia ... LINDOOOOO !!!!

 

Não vejo muita graça no Spotted

 

Valeu por ilustrar

 

Abraço


E-mail / MSN luiz.alfa@yahoo.com.br

Meu REEF DE ANEMONAS
http://www.reefcorner.org/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=150522

"Ter problemas na vida é inevitável, ser derrotado por eles é opcional"
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Osrom Almeida



São Gonçalo
RJ - Brasil


158 Mensagens

  #731704 Publicado - 07/07/2009 :  1:42:06 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Osrom Almeida a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Uma coleção de preciosidades. Valeu Erick
Osrom Almeida
osrom@uol.com.br
"Algo só é impossível até que alguém duvide e acabe provando o contrário." Albert Einstein
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Erick Camargo



São Paulo
SP - Brasil


819 Mensagens

  #731748 Publicado - 07/07/2009 :  3:33:33 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Erick Camargo a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado
Estou dando umas fuçadas em sites de fora, e com certeza logo irei compartilhar mais coisas interessantes como estas aqui na RC.

Abraços á todos e aos novos que estão vendo este tópico ajudem com mais fotos!

"Copiar uma idéia é plágio, várias, é pesquisa"!

Whatsapp: 11 968284685 (TIM)
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Renato Acconcia



Colaborador

Poços de Caldas
MG - Brasil


4634 Mensagens

  #731987 Publicado - 08/07/2009 :  3:10:14 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Renato Acconcia a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado
 
Abraços.
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Yuri Barros



São Paulo
SP - Brasil


816 Mensagens

  #733072 Publicado - 12/07/2009 :  10:32:12 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Yuri Barros a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado

O Palhaco é um Amphiprion sebae................do Oceano Indico..........a mancha preta na Cauda some quando ele fica mais velho............

 

De vez em quando aparece para vender........e é confundido com o Clark.........e vendido como Clark..............

 

Fica Grande e é Lindo..............é mais parente do A. polymnus do que do A. clarkii

 

Faz uma busca de imagens e compara...........

 

 

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Eduardo Cunha



Colaborador

Curitiba
PR - Brasil


1353 Mensagens

  #760914 Publicado - 17/10/2009 :  9:06:58 PM  Mostrar perfil  Adicionar Eduardo Cunha a lista de contatos Ver Álbum de Fotos
Não qualificado
Realmente perfeito!
.`.

"A NATUREZA ANTES DE SER COMANDADA, PRECISA SER COMPREENDIDA".
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